How the vortex flowmeter market thrived

Since their introduction in 1969, vortex flowmeters have had their share of ups and downs. Vibration issues    caused a problem for a while, generating false readings. Suppliers addressed this problem by developing        advanced software that was able to distinguish between genuine vortices and unrelated disturbances. Measuring  very low flowrates remains a problem for vortex flowmeters, since the flow has to be rapid enough to generate  vortices.  Reducer vortex flowmeters were introduced to generate a stronger vortex signal, especially at low   flowrates.

For many years, vortex flowmeters have suffered from a lack of industry approvals. Industry approvals,         especially for custody-transfer operations, have greatly helped the growth of the DP, turbine, ultrasonic,     magnetic, and Coriolis flowmeter markets. In 2007, a committee of the American Petroleum Institute (API)       approved a draft standard for the use of vortex flowmeters for custody-transfer applications. While this       draft standard had little initial effect on the market, it was revisited in 2010. It has now been              reformulated more specifically as a standard for gas flow measurement. While the future of this draft          standard is not completely determined, it will likely have a positive impact on the market.