Insertion vortex flowmeters

  Insertion vortex flowmeters offer a viable option to companies that want to measure flow in large pipes, especially those pipes with an internal diameter greater than 12”. Common accuracy levels for insertion vortex flowmeters are in the 1 percent range for liquids and 1.5 percent for steam and gases. Gases and steam are more difficult to measure than liquids for most flowmeter types, although thermal flowmeters are better suited for gas measurements than liquid measurements.

  Insertion meters are sometimes used to measure flow in pipes that cannot be shut down. Because insertion meters can be hot tapped, the meters can be swapped out or parts can be replaced without shutting down the line. Inline meters do not have this advantage unless a bypass line is installed, and even so the line has to be shut down to install the bypass line. This gives insertion vortex meters additional flexibility over inline meters.

One reason insertion vortex meters cannot achieve the same accuracy as some inline meters is that they are making a single-point measurement inside the pipe. Some inline meters, such as multipath ultrasonic meters, make multiple measurements and create a calculated average to determine flowrate. Insertion vortex meters make a point measurement and then compute the flow through the whole pipe based on flow profile considerations. The formula used to make this calculation is based on extensive testing and can be improved with time and experience.

  Insertion vortex meters compete with insertion magnetic and insertion turbine meters, as well as with averaging Pitot tubes. They have an advantage over insertion magnetic flowmeters, which cannot measure the flow of gases or steam. While insertion turbine meters can be very effective in clean fluids, their rotors and bearings can be damaged by impurities in the flowstream. Vortex meters can handle fluids with impurities, as long as they do not dislodge the bluff body.

  Averaging Pitot tubes are often used to measure the flow of air and of stack gases. While single-point Pitot tubes also measure flow at a point, averaging Pitot tubes measure flow at multiple points, and make a total flow measurement based on these multiple measurements. While making multiple flow measurements in a pipe typically produces more accurate results than measurement with a single point, averaging Pitot tubes can be clogged by impurities in the flowstream.

  Insertion vortex meters are typically placed in the center of the pipe, where flow velocity is fastest. However, other locations are possible, depending on the measurement configuration. Often, insertion vortex meters are adjustable, allowing them to be used with pipes of different sizes, and they have lower install costs than insertion DP flowmeters.

  Interestingly, the top three suppliers of vortex flowmeters, Yokogawa, Emerson Rosemount, and Endress+Hauser, do not manufacture insertion vortex meters. Instead, they have left this market to some of the suppliers with less market share. Examples of suppliers of insertion vortex flowmeters include VorTek Instruments, Spirax Sarco, Oval Corporation, and Nice Instrumentation.

  Spirax Sarco introduced its inline vortex meters in 1986 and its insertion vortex meters in 1991. At that time, the company was known as EMCO Flow Systems.  EMCO is based in Longmont, Colo., and was acquired by Spirax Sarco of the United Kingdom in 2005.

  Founded in 1995, VorTek Instruments specializes in vortex flowmeters, including wafer, flanged, and insertion. The company also sells turbine flowmeters. In January 2013, Azbil acquired a majority stake in VorTek Instruments.  Azbil is the Japanese company formerly known as Yamatake Corporation. Since the acquisition, Azbil VorTek has continued to sell its vortex and turbine meters and has also developed a line of ultrasonic flowmeters.